M.Ed. in Communication Sciences and Disorders


The Master of Education (M.Ed.) in Communication Sciences and Disorders is a full-time clinical degree program with a long, successful record of producing clinicians who are fully prepared for a rewarding career as a Speech-Language Pathologist.

The Character of Our Master's Program


Our graduate program consists of both academic preparation and clinical training. Both components are focused on developing the knowledge and skills needed for a career as a practicing Speech Language Pathologist (SLP). Students begin the graduate program by attending classes at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, Virginia while simultaneously initiating their clinical training in the Sheila Johnson Center (SJC).

SJC is our in-house, multidisciplinary clinic that serves patients from central Virginia who are seeking diagnostic or treatment services from speech language pathologists, audiologists, counselors, and/or literacy specialists. SJC is where our CSD graduate students learn core clinical competencies.

Our graduate program is specially designed to meet the needs of students who already have a background in Communication Sciences and Disorders (Track 1 curriculum) as well as those who do not (Track 2 curriculum). Students with have background in CSD have already completed the four required preprofessional courses:

  1. Anatomy and Physiology and the Speech and Hearing Mechanisms
  2. Speech and Hearing Sciences
  3. Introduction to Audiology
  4. Phonetics

Students usually complete the Track 1 curriculum in 5 academic semesters, which includes one summer. Track 1 students start serving clients in SJC from the very beginning of their graduate program. The Track 2 curriculum offers students the opportunity to complete the required preprofessional courses as part of their graduate program of study. Track 2 students do not begin serving clients in SJC until spring semester, and usually complete the program in 7 semesters. “In residence” refers to the period of time during which graduate students are completing academic courses “on Grounds” (that is UVA’s term for “on campus”) and therefore must live in the Charlottesville area. Track 1 students are in residence for one academic year. Track 2 students are in residence for two academic years. After completing the “in residence” portion of their program, a few remaining academic courses are completed online. This allows students to seek clinical training opportunities in the geographic area(s) of their choice.

After successfully acquiring core competencies in SJC, students begin clinical rotations in public school and health care agencies. Usually, these rotations are beyond the physical boundaries of the University of Virginia. CSD graduate students must complete two “externships” during which they attend academic classes 2 to 3 days per week while also continuing their clinical training 2 to 3 days per week. One externship must be completed with adults, usually in a health care setting. One externship must be completed in a public-school setting. Each externship is a full semester in length.

During the last semester of their graduate program of study, students are engaged in a full-time “internship” 5 days per week while also completing their national Praxis exam and comprehensive examinations. The internship semester can be completed in the practice setting of the student’s choice (health care, education, private practice) in almost any geographic location in the United States.

Every class and every clinical assignment is aimed at producing clinicians who are prepared for (1) the entire Scope of Practice in Speech-Language Pathology, and (2) the entire continuum of care from acute care, NICU, and early intervention to rehabilitation and school-based clinical practice. Our courses and clinical practica emphasize hands-on learning and making clinical decisions through evidenced-based practice. We are in the business of creating professionals for the modern workplace.

We have a thesis option for those who are thinking about the possibility of pursuing a Ph.D. sometime down the road. We enthusiastically embrace students who want to do a master's thesis, but only after we have thoroughly discussed the realities of timing and the possibility of adding another semester of grad school.

Our Degree

Our clinical degree is the M.Ed. because we are a part of the School of Education and Human Development. Just like every other accredited program, our classroom and clinical experiences cover the entire SLP Scope of Practice. From a content perspective, the degree is no different than the M.A. or M.S. in SLP. Every student practices SLP in schools and every student practices in medically based settings (see the section on Clinical Placements). Our grads take entry-level positions in both settings.

The Master of Education (M.Ed.) education program in speech-language pathology at the University of Virginia is accredited by the Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, 2200 Research Boulevard, #310, Rockville, MD 20850, 800-498-2071 or 301-296-5700.

The Program complies with all applicable laws, regulations, and executive orders prohibiting discrimination towards students, faculty, staff, and persons served in our clinic -- including prohibitions on discrimination based on any category prohibited by applicable law including, but not limited to, age, citizenship, disability, ethnicity, gender identity, genetic information, national origin, race, religion, sex, sexual orientation, and veteran status.

In fact, our faculty members and students are committed to the principles of diversity, inclusion, equity, respect, and dignity among ourselves and everyone we serve.

Our Mission Statement

The graduate program in Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of Virginia prepares students for the professional practice of Speech Language Pathology. We provide academic and clinical instruction for establishing the knowledge and skill base necessary for (a) completing the Master's degree, (b) becoming a credentialed speech-language pathologist, and (c) practicing speech-language pathology across a variety of service settings and with culturally and linguistically diverse populations. That knowledge and skill base conforms to the Scope of Practice as defined by the American Speech Language Hearing Association.

Fellowship Opportunity

The School of Education and Human Development is offering $12,000 fellowships to well-qualified individuals seeking to become speech-language pathologists who plan to work in P-12 schools. The purpose of Project VIDEO (Virginia Intensification for Individuals with Dyslexia who need Explicitness and Ongoing Tiered Supports) is to prepare speech-language pathologists alongside special education teachers as they learn to support students with learning disabilities, including dyslexia. Scholars who accept funding from the federal government are expected to work with students with disabilities in schools for two years for every one year they accept funding. Academic and externship requirements of the Track 1 CSD curriculum conflict with Project VIDEO requirements. Therefore, only Track 2 students are eligible for this fellowship opportunity. See the Project VIDEO webpage for more information.

Discover More

Program Details


  • Prerequisites and Admission Requirements

    GRE scores are required for applicants applying to begin in fall 2022.

    Applicants must submit an online application including the following items:

    • 2 letters of recommendation with at least 1 from a faculty member. Letters should be submitted through the online application system.
    • unofficial transcripts
    • unofficial GRE scores, as per instructions in the online application system.
    • a personal statement (1-2 double-spaced pages)

    Applicants may submit unofficial test scores and transcripts with their application. However, official test scores (taken with 5 years) and official transcripts showing degree conferral are required prior to matriculation.  The institution code for the University of Virginia is 5820. Recent average GRE scores for applicants admitted to a master's program were 156 verbal, 153 quantitative, and 4.5 writing.

    Applicants are responsible for ensuring that all required materials are submitted by the deadline. Incomplete applications will not be read and may be cancelled if left incomplete. Materials should be tracked using the checklist in the application.

    Before beginning the application process, potential students should determine whether they will apply for admissions as a Track I or Track 2 student.  The online application requires applicants to choose the curriculum track to which they want to apply.  Applications are reviewed accordingly and offers of admission are for only the track that an applicant has selected.  Please review the information on this website that describes the differences and similarities across the two programs of study.  We are happy to answer any question at a visitation session, via email, or by phone.

    The review of applications begins immediately after the due date. Late or incomplete applications will not be reviewed.


    Per ASHA certification requirements, students who seek a graduate degree in speech language pathology must have completed at least one undergraduate course in each of the following disciplines:

    • mathematics
    • statistics
    • social or behavioral sciences
    • biology
    • physics OR chemistry

    Applicants who are offered admission must have completed these 5 undergraduate courses BEFORE THEY MAY BEGIN graduate studies in our program. A review of official transcripts must include passing grades in all 5 of these courses before August 16 in order to enroll in our graduate program. In other words, an offer of admission is contingent upon satisfactory completion of all necessary undergraduate coursework. Any student who accepts an offer of admission (for either the Track 1 or Track 2 program) but whose official transcripts do not include courses that satisfy these five requirements, may defer entry into their designated Track for one year to complete the missing undergraduate requirements.

    Students who are offered admission to the Track 2 program and who defer for one year must enroll the following year in the Track 2 program. An offer of admission to the Track 2 program is not transferable to the Track 1 program following deferral.

  • Tuition and Fees

    Tuition and Fees are determined by the UVA Board of Visitors and are subject to change. See the current tuition and fee schedule for School of Education and Human Development graduate students, as well as tuition and fees for Summer School.

    Questions regarding federal financial aid questions are best directed to UVA Financial Services. The FASFA is due on March 1. Be sure to request Work Study among the forms of support that you request. On our application, be sure to check the box next in the “Are you requesting financial support” item. 

    Our Program does offer financial support to as many students as our budget will allow. The federal government sets the rate for each student. Typically, this support comes in the form of wage earning positions at about 8 hours per week during the academic semesters in which they are in residence.  Student workers are typically assigned to a position in our clinic or in a research lab.

  • Application & Acceptance

    Application deadline is December 1. After this date, we are busy working our way through applications. The first stage of review identifies applicants who will be invited for interviews. We begin sending invitations for interviews in December. Be certain to watch your email account, including spam/junk folders. Interview invitations are sent only once. Applicants who do not respond to the invitation by the required date are not reviewed further. Interviews are conducted in January and February.

    The letter that you write for yourself is important. We are interested in learning about your accomplishments and experiences. We also heavily weight your letters of recommendation.

    We are interested in your entire application, especially how your background and experiences may prepare you for training that will lead to a career as a speech language pathologist who leads the profession and provides services to diverse populations. In general, we are looking for individuals with strong academic performance who have the maturity to learn how to help others in a clinical environment.

    We send offers of admission in early March. Offers of Program financial support follow later in March.  The University calculates tuition and fees and analyzes student FAFSA data in mid-to-late summer.

    Our target incoming class is 27 individuals. About half of those individuals will have a degree in communication disorders (Track 1 students), and about half will have a degree in something other than communication disorders (Track 2 students). Everyone we invite to join us has until April 15 to accept/decline our offer.  However, we urge you to secure your seat in the class and accept our invitation once you are ready to make a serious commitment to UVA. To make certain the UVA is the right fit for you, please review our current Graduate Student Handbook and all of our Master's program webpages, including the FAQs.

    Often, UVA is the first choice grad school for several individuals on our wait list. Please do not accept our invitation unless you intend to attend UVA. If you decide to attend another university, please let us know as soon as possible. That way, we can extend an offer to someone on the waitlist in a timely manner. Thank you.

    Between March 1 and April 15, we will hold online meetings designed to provide you with all the information you need to make your decision. All invited and waitlist applicants will receive invitations to these meetings. Each week a member of our faculty will discuss their clinical interests, their research interests, and their classes. Our students will conduct one of the meetings as well.

    The meetings are informal and optional. Every session will provide ample opportunity for questions and answers. For privacy purposes, these sessions are not recorded.

    In early March, we will send the schedule of meeting times and topics. You may attend any or all of the online sessions as you like.

    When you accept our offer of admission, you should immediately activate your UVA email account by following the instructions that are in the online admissions system. Your UVA email is how we will contact you for the next steps.

    After a new class is formed (that means: after everyone has activated their UVA email account), our current students can reach out and will offer each new student a "go-to buddy" who has volunteered to become a first point of contact for one new student. Our NSSHLA members will also communicate "roomie" opportunities with current students. Our students will also establish a Facebook page for your incoming class. Finally, our current students will invite you to a social event just before school starts.

    At the beginning of June, all new students will be emailed an invitation to a Canvas site that we create for each incoming group. This site provides instructions and resources for the tasks that you need to complete before beginning your graduate program. Over the summer, faculty members will contact you regarding clinical and academic advising. In the days before school starts, we will conduct an extensive clinical orientation as well as an important academic orientation (OnBoarding), plus individual advising sessions. Everyone will be completely squared away before the first day of classes.

  • Determining Your Track

    The Communication Sciences and Disorders (CSD) Program at UVA offers two options for completing a master's degree in speech language pathology: one that is designed for students who have a background in CSD before beginning their graduate program of study (Track 1) and another for students who enter the graduate program without having completed the required pre-professional courses (Track 2).

    Track 1 students usually have a bachelor's degree in CSD or have completed the pre-professional coursework through non-degree online courses before beginning the graduate program.  The Track 1 program of study is usually completed in 5 to 6 semesters.

    Track 2 students have a bachelor's degree in discipline outside of CSD, such as linguistics, psychology, or education.  Some Track 2 students attended universities where an option to major in CSD was not available. Other Track 2 students are changing careers.  The Track 2 program of study usually requires 7 semesters to be completed.

    In our program, we value both Track 1 and Track 2 students equally.

    We reserve about half of the seats in our graduate program for Track 2 students, with the remaining seats going to Track 1 students.  Your application will be considered for only the specific track to which you apply.

    To apply for admission as a Track 1 student, the following undergraduate pre-professional courses are expected to be completed with at least at B- grade before beginning the graduate program:

    • Phonetics
    • Speech AND Hearing Science (a single course in speech science OR a single course in hearing science is not sufficient)
    • Anatomy and Physiology of the Speech and Hearing Mechanism (a course in general anatomy and physiology is not sufficient)
    • Introduction to Audiology

    If you have completed these 4 pre-professional courses, please apply to our program to be a Track 1 student.

    If you have not completed these 4 pre-professional courses, please apply to our program to be a Track 2 student.

    If you might complete the 4 pre-professional courses before beginning your graduate program, or are uncertain about which track to choose, you should apply to our program as a Track 1 student.

    During the admissions review period, applications are considered for admission to the specific track selected by the potential student.  With all applicants, we are looking for indicators that the potential graduate student has the social-emotional maturity to benefit from the clinical training process and that they are likely to successfully complete the graduate program and enjoy a career providing quality care for diverse populations.  We also seek to admit cohorts that include an array of individuals who bring with them diverse backgrounds, interests, experiences, goals, and talents.  We consider the abilities and backgrounds of individuals, as well as the composition of the cohorts, when making offers of admission.  Once offers of admission are accepted by the students, the program begins allocating resources and planning for the incoming cohorts accordingly.

    Applicants who are offered admission to our program are specifically offered admission as either a Track 1 or Track 2 student.

    Please carefully consider which track would be appropriate for you.  Once you begin the online application, you will be required to choose only one track. Your application will be considered for only that track. Accepting an offer of admission for a specific track is a binding decision.

    Frequently Asked Questions about choosing the appropriate track when applying:

    I have completed two or three of the four pre-professional courses.  To which track should I apply?

    Apply for admission as a Track 1 student.

    If you are offered and accept admission to our Track 1 program, we will complete a review of your transcripts before you register for your first semester. At that time, we will determine which pre-professional courses you still need to complete and how that might impact your program of study.

    I have completed only one of the four pre-professional courses. To which track should I apply?

    The answer to that question will depend on whether or not you plan to complete any more courses prior to beginning your graduate program, perhaps through online offerings.

    If you plan to complete any more additional pre-professional courses prior to beginning your graduate program, apply now for admission as a Track 1 student. See the above question as well.
    If you do not plan to complete any more pre-professional courses prior to beginning your graduate program you may apply for admission as a Track 2 student. In other words, if you will have only one pre-professional course completed when you begin your graduate program, you may apply to be a Track 2 student.

    If I accept admission to the program as a Track 2 student and I complete additional pre-professional courses before I begin my graduate program, may I change to the Track 1 program of study?

    No. Seats in the two tracks are not interchangeable.

    Offers of admission are made to selected numbers of Track 2 applicants and selected numbers of Track 1 applicants for admission to those specific programs of study. Seats are specifically reserved for Track 2 students. Students who accept offers of admission to the Track 2 program are expected to enroll in the Track 2 program as planned. A different option would be wait a year and apply during the next application cycle for admission as a Track 1 student. An offer of admission to the Track 2 program in one year does not secure admission to the Track 1 program in a subsequent application cycle.

    What if I am still not sure?

    Apply for admission as a Track 1 student.

    If you are offered and accept admission to our Track 1 program, we will complete a review of your transcripts before you register for your first semester. At that time, we will determine which pre-professional courses you still need to complete and how that might impact your program of study.

    I have other questions. How can I get help?

    We are happy to answer questions at a visitation session, via email, or by phone. A schedule of visitation options along with contact information can be found on the website.

  • Track I Curriculum

    Classes

    The Track I curriculum is designed for (1) individuals with an undergraduate degree in communication disorders, and (2) individuals with an undergraduate degree in something other than communication disorders who have successfully completed all of the ASHA pre-professional courses at another CAA accredited program.  The Track I curriculum is completed in five consecutive semesters (summers included). 

    First year Track I students take some courses with first year Track 2 students and other courses with second-year Track II students. At the beginning of the program of study, the academic course load is heavy. As you progress through the curriculum, the proportion of your time working with clients increases and the proportion of class time begins to diminish. With time, the initial pattern gradually reverses until you are spending more time in clinical assignments than in class.

    Clinic

    Students in our Track I curriculum begin seeing clients right away in our clinic. First clinical assignments always occur in the Sheila Johnson Center (SJC), our in-house clinic. Twenty-five hours of clinical observation is the first order of business for Track I Associate Clinicians who have yet to acquire them. Most Associate Clinicians are assigned one or two treatment clients and an occasional assessment during the first semester. Under the supervision and guidance of our Clinical Supervisors, Associate Clinicians are responsible for all clinical services, including documents and billing. Individual caseloads increase as an Associate Clinician becomes more capable.

    After developing core clinical competencies in SJC, students begin a series of clinical rotations, usually referred to as “external placements” because they are completed at agencies outside of the University. Externships are half-time clinical assignments that are completed while also taking academic courses. Each is a semester-long assignment. The final semester is dedicated to a full-time clinical internship (40+ hours per week for 16 weeks). These occur in Virginia and across the United States. In essence, our new graduates are very familiar with the work-a-day life and responsibilities of an SLP.

    During the final internship semester, students also enroll in a capstone independent study in which they complete steps in preparation for certification as a practitioner, in addition to preparing for and completing the comprehensive exam. This is an oral presentation of a real life case study (sort of Grand Rounds presentation of a client seen at the internship site).  Students practice these types of presentations in several classes throughout their studies.

    Track I Curriculum - 2021-2022
  • Track II Curriculum

    Classes

    The Track II curriculum is designed for individuals with an undergraduate degree in something other than communication disorders. In the first year, Track II students take (1) pre-professional courses (e.g., Speech & Hearing Science, Clinical Phonetics) with upper-class undergraduate students, and (2) some professional courses (e.g., Articulation and Phonology) with first-year Track I students.  In the second year of Track II studies, students are paired with the cohort of incoming first-year Track I students.

    Importantly, the Track II curriculum is integrated in every aspect of our Program operations from the very start.  It follows that Track II students are involved in every aspect of our Program.  We commit about half of the seats in an incoming class to Track II students. 

    Some applicants have completed 1 or some of the ASHA pre-professional courses at another university, perhaps online.  In that case we adapt accordingly and so the curriculum for some students is somewhere between Track I and Track I. That’s not uncommon for us.

    The course load in the first year is heavy.  There is a lot to learn before you start seeing clients! As you progress through the curriculum, the proportion of your time working with clients increases and the proportion of class time begins to diminish. With time, the initial pattern gradually reverses until you are spending more time in clinical assignments than in class.

    Clinic

    Track II students enter our clinic right away. Associate Clinicians observe several clinician-client pairs throughout their first Fall semester and become responsible for client care in their first Spring semester. As an Associate Clinician becomes more capable, additional clients are added to the caseload.

    In the summer and second fall semesters, caseloads are substantial. Under the supervision and guidance of our Clinical Supervisors, Associate Clinicians are responsible for all clinical services, including documents and billing.

    After developing core clinical competencies in SJC, students begin a series of clinical rotations, usually referred to as “external placements” because they are completed at agencies outside of the University. Externships are half-time clinical assignments that are completed while also taking academic courses. Each is a semester-long assignment. The final semester is dedicated to a full-time clinical internship (40+ hours per week for 16 weeks). These occur in Virginia and across the United States. In essence, our new graduates are very familiar with the work-a-day life and responsibilities of an SLP.

    During the final internship semester, students also enroll in a capstone independent study in which they complete steps in preparation for certification as a practitioner, in addition to preparing for and completing the comprehensive exam. This is an oral presentation of a real life case study (sort of Grand Rounds presentation of a client seen at the internship site). Students practice these types of presentations in several classes throughout their studies.

    Track II Curriculum 2021-2022
  • Our Faculty & Staff

    Ms. Claire Barbao

    Ms. Barbao, M.A., CCC-SLP is a Clinical Supervisor of Speech Language Pathology.  The focus of Ms. Barbao's clinical practice includes fluency, early intervention, child language, articulation, motor speech disorders and adult rehabilitation.  Ms. Barbao has clinical experience in both inpatient and outpatient medical settings, as well as private practice, telepractice, and the public school system.  Ms. Barbao currently supervises students in the Sheila C. Johnson Center full time.  She believe in providing quality therapy services by engaging in collaboration with other professionals and providing education to families. Ms. Barbao enjoys providing treatment and evaluation to both children and adults.

    Dr. Michaela DuBay

    Michaela DuBay, Ph.D., CCC-SLP is an Assistant Professor who specializes in early identification and intervention for autism spectrum disorders.  She holds a doctorate in Speech and Hearing Sciences from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  Dr. DuBay is interested in how assessment and intervention methods can be modified to meet the needs of culturally and linguistically diverse families.  Through community-based and mixed-methods approaches, her research has centered around the translation and cultural adaptation process for parent-report autism screening tools and parent-mediated interventions, specifically for Spanish-speaking Latin populations.

    Dr. Jane Hilton

    Jane Hilton, Ph.D., CCC-SLP is an Association Professor of Speech Language Pathology.  Her interests involve examining the efficacy and effectiveness of early intervention programs for young children diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder.  Dr. Hilton teaches in both the graduate and undergraduate programs in the Communication Sciences and Disorders program.  She provides direct supervision to graduate students and assists in placing the students for their off-site clinical practicum.  She has extensive experience in the area of clinical supervision and enjoys watching young clinicians grow and develop their skills.  Dr. Hilton has served as President of the Speech-Language-Hearing Association of Virginia (SHAV) and has been an active participant in the annual convention Planning Committee.  She has served on the Board of Directors of the Communication Disorders Foundation of Virginia.

    Dr. LaVae Hoffman

    LaVae M. Hoffman, Ph.D., CCC-SLP serves as the Program Director Communication Sciences and Disorders program.  She is an ASHA Fellow and an Associate Professor of child language development and disorders.  As a clinical practitioner, she provided services to children and adults in public school and medical settings, and administrated local and statewide programs for children with and without disabilities.  She has also served the profession as a university clinical instructor.  She completed her doctorate at The University of Texas.  Her research includes the effectiveness and efficacy of language intervention, evidence-based practice in school settings, and addressing the needs of parents of school age students with language impairment.  As a distinguished instructor, Dr. Hoffman has been inducted into the University of Virginia's Academy of Teaching and served on its executive board.  She currently serves as a CAA accreditation site visitor.  She has also served the profession as an associate editor for Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, and chair of ASHA's Special Interest Group 1: Language Learning and Education coordinating committee.  Her Talking EBP digital newsletter is in is second decade of continuous publication and reaches thousands of school-based SLPs twice each year.  Dr. Hoffman has received two Editor's Awards in recognition of the quality and impact of her research publications in ASHA peer-reviewed journals.

    Dr. Filip Loncke

    Dr. Filip Loncke is an Associate Professor and serves as the academic advisor for the Communication Sciences and Disorders program.  His teaching and research focus centers on assessment and treatment strategies for individuals with profound communication disorders through augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) models.  He explores cognitive and linguistic factors related to the use of ACC approaches such as gestures, manual signing, picture communication, and the use of speech-generating devices - all for the purpose of developing effective assessment and intervention strategies.  Dr. Loncke presently works on a series of publications regarding the psycholinguistics of graphic symbol use.

    Dr. Kazlin Mason

    Kazlin Mason, Ph.D., CCC-SLP is an Assistant Professor.  Research in her Imaging and Communication Outcomes Lab integrates imaging technology, 3D computer visualization, and predictive analytics to study speech physiology and optimize care for children with cleft and craniofacial differences.  Her work aims to identify patient-specific indicators for successful speech and surgical outcomes.  Dr. Mason's area of clinical expertise include cleft/craniofacial anomalies, voice, resonance, and upper airway disorders, and pediatric dysphagia.  As a medically-focused speech pathologist, Dr. Mason's teaching interests span the areas of anatomy and physiology, imaging and assessment methodologies for voice/resonance/swallowing disorders, and research methods.  She is an affiliate of Special Interest Group (SIG) 5: Craniofacial and Velopharyngeal Disorders and member of the American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association.  She also serves on the ASHA SIG 5 Professional Development Committee and is the Continuing Education Content Manager for SIG 5.

    Ms. Rebecca Rehm

    Ms. Rehm, M.S., CCC-SLP is a Clinical Supervisor in the Speech Communication Disorders program.  The focus of Ms. Rehm's clinical practice includes articulation, phonology, motor speech disorders, language and early intervention.  She is experienced in the delivery of clinical services within inpatient and outpatient rehabilitation settings as well as within school systems.  Ms. Rehm supervises students in the Center and at area private schools.  She values multidisciplinary collaboration and parent education.  She is a former member of the Board of Directors of the Communication Disorders Foundation of Virginia.

    Dr. Randall Robey

    Randall R. Robey, Ph.D., CCC-SLP is  Associate Professor.  His research combines two area of concentration: (a) clinical aphasiology, and (b) quantifying valid indices of change brought about by clinical interventions.  Dr. Robey's publications largely center on assessing the effectiveness and efficacy of treatments for aphasia.  This focus encompasses meta-analysis, evidence-based practice, and clinical-outcome research comprising both group and single-subject research designs.

    Ms. Jaimee Traub

    Ms. Traub, M.S., CCC-SLP is the Director of Clinical Services and Training within the Sheila C. Johnson Center for Human Services.  The focus of Ms. Traub's clinical practice includes pragmatic language and social communication, child and adolescent language, and pediatric speech sound disorders.  Ms. Traub has experience with behavior management and enjoys collaborating across therapeutic disciplines to evaluate and treat children and young adults.  She is experienced in the delivery of clinical services within public and private school systems as well as multidisciplinary outpatient clinics.  Ms. Traub supervises graduate students in the Center full time.

    Dr. Cassandra Turner

    Cassandra Turner, Au.D. is an Assistant Clinical Professor in the Sheila Johnson Center for Human Services (SJC). She received her undergraduate degree in Speech Communication Disorders from the University of Virginia with a minor in American Sign Language (ASL) and Deaf Studies. She completed her doctoral studies at Gallaudet University before returning to UVA to join the CSD faculty.

  • Public Professional Licensure Disclosures

    As a member of the State Authorizations Reciprocity Agreement, the University of Virginia (UVA) is authorized to provide curriculum in a distance learning environment to students located in all states in the United States except for California. (34 CFR 668.43(a)(6)& 34 CFR 668.72(n)).

    Upon completion of the M.Ed. in Communication Sciences and Disorders program at the UVA School of Education and Human Development, graduates may be eligible for initial professional licensure in another U.S. state by applying to the licensing board or agency in that state. Please visit the University’s state authorization web pages to make an informed decision regarding which states’ educational requirements for initial licensure are met by this program. (668.43(a)(5) (v)(A) - (C))

    Enrolled students who change their current (or mailing) address to a state other than Virginia should update this information immediately in the Student Information System as it may impact their ability to complete internship, practicum, or clinical hours, use Title IV funds, or meet licensure or certification requirements in the new state. (34 CFR 668.402).

The information contained on this website is for informational purposes only. The Undergraduate Record and Graduate Record represent the official repository for academic program requirements. These publications may be found at http://records.ureg.virginia.edu/index.php.