Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion


The School of Education and Human Development values diversity, equity and inclusion in all of its complexity and richness. We engage our students with multiple perspectives to prepare them to be active agents of change in a complex global society. We intentionally seek opportunities to expand diversity at our school through recruitment, retention, teaching, research and service. Our goal is the development of a community that promotes and values diversity and equity.

“We must rededicate ourselves – as educators and as citizens – to the work of inclusion and equity, and to improving civic education. To unflinchingly examining and owning a history that can neither be erased or replaced while also claiming a better, improved future.”

– Dean Pianta

Though many strides have been made, there is much more work to be done. Our quest is to create and sustain a learning community that purposefully and strategically acknowledges and values diversity, equity and inclusion — and is committed to preparing educators and other professionals who will, through teaching, research and service, contribute to a body of knowledge that will improve outcomes for all learners.

The School of Education and Human Development is deeply committed to the daily work of equity and inclusion. There are lots of ways to get involved in this work. Check out our Office of Diversity, Equity, & Inclusion’s leadership, learn about our student engagement, and explore our many programs and events, such as our annual Common Read and DEI Collective Learning Series!

  • Research


    At the School of Education and Human Development, we believe that the study of equity, inclusion and race is an integral part of the study of education. Below are just a few examples of the research centers, labs or projects that are actively researching how to address the needs of a culturally diverse society. 

    Center for Race and Public Education in the South
    Teachers in the Movement
    Youth-Nex Center to Promote Effective Youth Development
  • History


    Building a better future begins with examining the past. Our annual lectures series honors the legacy of Walter Ridley, who became the first African-American to graduate from UVA when he earned his doctorate in 1953 from the School of Education and Human Development. Our student-led conference, the Hunter Student Research Conference, is named after Dr. Louis Stokes Hunter -- the first Black woman to graduate from the University of Virginia School of Education and Human Development, in the same year. Both were trailblazers and represent the best of our school’s legacy.

    The Life of Walter N. Ridley
    The Walter N. Ridley Distinguished Speaker Series
    Reflecting on Our Namesakes
  • Service


    Our Diversity Action Committee (DAC) has served as a bedrock for our diversity efforts. Composed of faculty, staff, and students, DAC works closely with the Faculty Council and the School of Education and Human Development's Office of DEI to enact the school’s equity-minded mission. The DAC promotes programming related to the Common Read, executes our annual Teaching Workshop, reviews DEI Small Grants (administered through the Office of DEI), and serves as a space for thought to a cultivation of school culture and atmosphere where all faculty, staff, and students can reach their full potential. Learn more about DAC’s history and members.

    DEI Collective Professional Learning Series
    Common Read
    Diversity Action Committee
    Seeds4Change
    Upcoming Events