Media Hits


CBS19

A group of researchers at the University of Virginia are offering resources to help teachers address issues of racial injustice in the classroom.

The initiative called "Educating for Democracy" uses the way U.S. history is taught to properly explain current events.

"We really have to think about racism within the context of America and the context of schooling if we want to move towards this democracy that we're working so hard for," said Johari Harris, the initiative's director.

Thursday, January 21, 2021
Teen Vogue

Their feelings are supported by science: Micah Mazurek and Gerrit Van Schalkwyk, professors at the University of Virginia and University of Utah, respectively, tell Teen Vogue about two separate studies they conducted that confirmed the positive influence of social media in neurodiverse teenagers’ and adults’ lives. Van Schalkwyk says that neurodiverse young people who use social media tend to have stronger friendships, and more of them, than their peers who stay offline, potentially because social media “makes up for some of the differences in their communication style and plays to their strengths, in particular.”

Wednesday, January 20, 2021
NBC29

A new online resource offered by UVA School of Education and Human Development’s Center for Race and Public Education in the South aims to support K-12 teachers and students grappling with issues of race and justice.

Monday, January 18, 2021
Christian Science Monitor

For many Americans, that wound has grown more painful with the way it has historically been taught, says Derrick Alridge, a professor at the University of Virginia’s Curry School of Education and Human Development. Dr. Alridge recently chaired Virginia’s Commission on African American History Education, charged with auditing the state’s efforts to teach Black history. Released last August, its 80-page report identifies faults endemic to curricula across the country. 

Sunday, January 17, 2021
CBS19

The University of Virginia is leading the Commonwealth’s new plan to improve mental health in K-12 students. A new statewide project called the Virginia Partnership for School Mental Health aims to strengthen school mental health services. 

"Mental health needs in students are increasing and are really important and there’s a shortage of qualified school mental health providers. What we’re trying to do is simply. If we pair universities who are training the next generation of mental health providers with school divisions in the area who need them the most, we think we’re going to help increase the pipeline," said Dr. Michael Lyons, a UVA professor and co-director of the Virginia Partnership for School Mental Health. 

Monday, January 11, 2021
The Virginian Pilot

Emily Solari, a professor of education at the University of Virginia’s Curry School of Education and Human Development, said it’s difficult to quantify the true impact of the pandemic on student learning. But she stressed that this environment is ripe for students to fall behind.

Saturday, January 9, 2021
The Atlanta Journal Constitution

“An active lifestyle does not have to cost any money. Social media collaborations and support are generally free – anyone can join support groups to improve accountability,” said Susan A. Saliba, a professor in the department of kinesiology, Curry School of Education at the University of Virginia.

Wednesday, January 6, 2021
WalletHub

We asked a panel of experts to share their advice on introducing positive changes both at home and at the policy level. 

Susan A. Saliba, Professor, Department of Kinesiology

Wednesday, January 6, 2021
KQED

University of Virginia education professor Patricia Ann Jennings has spent the last decade studying teacher stress. “Often teachers feel very alone in their classrooms and they feel very disconnected from the other adults,” she said. Her research points to a handful of common stressors, things as simple as teachers having to “hold it” when they need to use the restroom, not being able to just walk away from conflict and lacking privacy. 

Thursday, December 31, 2020
Education Week

Robert Q Berry III is a past president of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) and a current professor of mathematics education at the University of Virginia. He has been a teacher at nearly all levels and collaborates with parents, teachers, and community members across the U.S. to advocate for teachers and students.

Friday, December 18, 2020
Education Week

Still, addressing the persistence of cueing is a challenge that goes beyond curricula, said Emily Solari, a professor of reading education at the University of Virginia’s Curry School of Education and Human Development.

“We have generations of teachers who haven’t been provided adequate training on how to teach reading, through no fault of their own,” she said. “There are multiple things you have to push on—and just changing one curriculum, even a widely purchased and used curriculum, it’s not a silver bullet.”

Thursday, December 17, 2020
KQED

Scott Gest, a University of Virginia professor, says: “People talk about negative peer influence … but they neglect the pretty substantial literature that shows a lot of negative behavior of high school kids is discouraged by friends. There is a lot of very positive pressure that peers apply, like, ‘No man, that’s stupid.’”

 

Thursday, December 10, 2020
Chalkbeat

Robert Pianta, the dean of the University of Virginia’s School of Education and Human Development, said simultaneous instruction puts unprecedented pressure on educators, who are largely left to improvise in the absence of research or established best practices. Yet, as more schools reopen — with some families bound to stick with remote learning and with districts facing staffing constraints — the approach appears here to stay. 

“This is likely to be the primary mode of delivering education services in the coming months,” Pianta said. “We should be mobilizing resources to make it the best it can be.” 

Monday, December 7, 2020
Patch.com

Robert Pianta, the dean of the University of Virginia's School of Education and Human Development, said simultaneous instruction puts unprecedented pressure on educators, who are largely left to improvise in the absence of research or established best practices. Yet, as more schools reopen — with some families bound to stick with remote learning and with districts facing staffing constraints — the approach appears here to stay.

"This is likely to be the primary mode of delivering education services in the coming months," Pianta said. "We should be mobilizing resources to make it the best it can be."

Monday, December 7, 2020
WFDD Radio 101

 According to Jim Soland, Associate Professor of Education at the Curry School of Education and Human Development at the University of Virginia and Affiliated Research Fellow at NWEA, because of the pandemic, whenever we’re able to go back to “normal,” this disparity will be even greater.

“We would expect more variability in terms of achievement," explained Soland. "So there’d be a wider range of what students know and can do in any given classroom than there might’ve been in any other year.” 

Sunday, December 6, 2020
Christian Science Monitor

Robert Pianta, dean of the school of education and human development at the University of Virginia, says this crisis has laid bare where America’s failings lie. “It has definitely exposed weaknesses, in the same way 9-11 exposed the weaknesses in our homeland security,” he says. “I would hope that we are able to sit back and ask, ‘Are we doing this the right way?’ and double down on our efforts to dedicate ourselves to ‘harden’ that system.”

Thursday, December 3, 2020
KQED

That’s true not just of secret keeping, but fighting too. Scott Gest, professor and chair of human services at the Curry School of Education and Human Development, says conflict between friends often gets a bum rap, but it serves an important developmental function.

Monday, November 30, 2020
KQED

For years, education research focused on time-on-task as a measure of effective instruction, says Scott Gest, a professor at the University of Virginia. Through that lens, friends in elementary school appeared to be a negative, an impediment to focus and a catalyst for disruption. Even when the value of strong social ties gained recognition, friendships stood to the side conceptually, as developmentally important but not germane to academics. Yet recent research has confirmed two things many teachers have long believed to be true.

Wednesday, November 18, 2020
Newsweek

Dr. Dewey Cornell, forensic clinical psychologist and Professor of Education in the Curry School of Education at the University of Virginia, said that the increase in 2020 does not necessarily correlate to those in schools, offices, and restaurants, which the public often associates with mass shootings.

Monday, November 16, 2020
NECN NBC News

To help our kids become more thoughtful, " talk about morals and values," Adams-Bass says. She suggests saying, "'What's our family's morals and values? What do we believe?... Do we believe in fairness, do we believe in being just? Do we believe in everyone being treated equally and have an equal opportunity and access?'"

Thursday, November 12, 2020

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