Fall 2011 Curry Research Lectureship Series


Playing with Anger: The Socialization of Racial Coping Self-Efficacy in Youth

Howard Stevenson

 

Howard Stevenson
Friday, September 23 at 11am

Holloway Hall, First Floor, Bavaro Hall

Audio of Dr. Stevenson's Lecture

Sponsored by the Virginia Education Sciences Training Program, supported by the US Department of Education Institute of Education Sciences.

Racial/ethnic encounters are interactions of conflict or connection between individuals, families, and social systems. Given societal fear of racial conflict, avoidance is a common coping strategy but often results in distancing or difficult relationships. Research suggests that incompetence and fear of mismanagement of the encounters is very stressful and has implications for relationships with youth of color, particularly Black youth in schools. One negative outcome of unresolved racial/ethnic encounters is lower quality of adult authority (teachers, police, parents, counselors) to student relationships. Recast theory proposes that racial/ethnic socialization is a key mediating factor to help individuals manage stress from racial/ethnic encounters. This talk will discuss the role of racial/ethnic socialization as buffer and reappraisal of stress to promote racial coping self-efficacy and agency to resolve racial/ethnic encounters for Black youth. Videotaped examples of anger management and racial coping strategies will be presented from project PLAAY (Preventing Long-term Anger and Aggression in Youth).

Dr. Howard C. Stevenson is an Associate Professor and former Chair of the Applied Psychology and Human Development Division in the Graduate School of Education at the University of Pennsylvania. His research involves developing culturally relevant interventions for families and youth to improve their psychological adjustment in stressful situations. Dr. Stevenson and colleagues are conducting several  classroom- and playground-based racial negotiation skills-building interventions. Can We Talk (CWT) is designed to reduce negative stress reactions in student-teacher classroom relationships in public and independent schools. PLAAY (Preventing Long-term Anger and Aggression in Youth) uses athletics and racial socialization as anger management and racial coping tools for Black youth. Dr. Stevenson along with Penn professors Lorretta and John Jemmott and Chris Coleman have started the Barbershop Talk Project which teaches barbers to counsel 1100 Black males between 18-24 years old about retaliation violence and HIV/STD reduction strategies during haircut appointments, in a randomized field control trial.

 
Recent books:
Slaughter-Defoe, D, Stevenson, H. C., Arrington, E. G. & Johnson, D. (In press, expected Nov, 20011). Black Educational Choice in a Climate of School Reform: Assessing the private and public alternatives to Traditional K-12 Public Schools, Praeger. ABC-Clio Publishers: Santa Barbara, CA.
Stevenson, Jr., H. C. (2003). Playing with anger: Teaching coping skills to African American boys through athletics and culture. Westport, CT.: Greenwood Publishing, Praeger.
Stevenson, H. C., Davis, G. Y., & Abdul-Kabir, S. (2001). Stickin’ To, Watchin’ Over, and Gettin’ With: An African American Parent’s Guide to Discipline. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

 

Immigrants Raising Citizens: Undocumented Parents and Their Young Children

Hirokazu Yoshikawa

 

Hirokazu Yoshikawa
Friday, September 30 at 11am

Holloway Hall, First Floor, Bavaro Hall

Due to the sensitive nature of Dr. Yoshikawa's work we will not be posting an audio recording.

Sponsored by the Virginia Education Sciences Training Program, supported by the US Department of Education Institute of Education Sciences.

This talk will present data from the 2011 volume Immigrants Raising Citizens: Undocumented Parents and Their Young Children.  The data stem from a three-year study of 380 infants from Dominican, Mexican, Chinese, and African American families, which included ethnography, in-home child assessments, and parent surveys. The book shows that undocumented parents share three sets of experiences that distinguish them from legal-status parents and may adversely influence their children’s development: avoidance of programs and authorities, isolated social networks, and poor work conditions. Fearing deportation, undocumented parents often avoid accessing valuable resources that could help their children’s development—such as access to public programs and agencies providing child care and food subsidies. At the same time, many of these parents are forced to interact with illegal entities such as smugglers or loan sharks out of financial necessity. Undocumented immigrants also tend to have fewer reliable social ties to assist with child care or share information on child-rearing. Compared to legal-status parents, undocumented parents experience significantly more exploitive work conditions, including long hours, inadequate pay and raises, few job benefits, and limited autonomy in job duties. These conditions can result in ongoing parental stress, economic hardship, and avoidance of center-based child care—which is directly correlated with early skill development in children.  The result is poorly developed cognitive skills that are recognizable in children as young as two years old and can negatively impact their future school performance.

Hirokazu Yoshikawa is Professor of Education and Academic Dean at the Harvard Graduate School of Education.  He is a developmental and community psychologist who studies the development of young children in the U.S., China, and Chile.  He focuses on the effects of public policies, particularly those related to parental employment, poverty and early childhood care and education, on children of diverse ethnic and immigrant backgrounds. He received four early career awards from divisions of the American Psychological Association. He has been a member of the Board on Children, Youth and Families of the National Academy of Sciences, and is currently a member of the DHHS Advisory Committee on Head Start Research and Evaluation. His recent books include Making it Work: Low-Wage Employment, Family Life, and Child Development (Russell Sage, 2006, with Thomas S. Weisner and Edward Lowe) Toward Positive Youth Development: Transforming Schools and Community Programs (Oxford, 2008, with Marybeth Shinn), and Immigrants Raising Citizens: Undocumented Parents and Their Young Children (sole authored), published by Russell Sage.

 

Designing Research that Matters for Policy and Practice

Rebecca Maynard

 

Rebecca Maynard
Friday, October 7 at 11am

Holloway Hall, First Floor, Bavaro Hall

Audio of Dr. Maynard's Lecture

 

Sponsored by the Virginia Education Sciences Training Program, supported by the US Department of Education Institute of Education Sciences and the Education Policy program at the Curry School of Education.

Today more than ever, education policy makers and practitioners are thirsty for scientifically valid research to inform their work.  In part this thirst derives from the persistence of mediocre educational performance in the U.S. as compared with other nations and by extremely poor performance in certain education settings and for certain population groups.  But, more recently, as education budgets have been shrinking, the thirst is driven by the imperative to achieve more with less.  Feeding this thirst requires that the education research community be strategic in the questions it focuses on, the methods it uses to answer the questions, and the strategy it uses for communicating the findings.  The talk will suggest ways for sifting through myriad options for focal questions, settling on study designs that are both practical and rigorous, and disseminating the work for maximum impact.  

Rebecca A. Maynard, is Commissioner for the National Center of Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance (NCEERA) at the Institute of Education Sciences, where she oversees evaluations of federal education policies and programs, the What Works Clearinghouse, the Regional Education Laboratories, the National Library of Education, and ERIC.  Trained as an economist, Dr. Maynard has designed and implemented dozens of rigorous experimental-design and mixed-method evaluations, including evaluations of dropout prevention initiatives, strategies to improve the career and technical skills of vulnerable adults, home visitation services, health and sex education programs, school mentoring programs, and teacher professional development programs. Presently, she is on leave from her position as University Trustee Chair Professor of Education and Social Policy at the University of Pennsylvania.

 

Whither Opportunity? Rising Inequality, Schools and Children's LIfe Changes

Greg J. Duncan

 

Greg J. Duncan
Friday, December 2 at 11am
Holloway Hall, First Floor, Bavaro Hall

Audio and Slides from Dr. Duncan's Lecture

Sponsored by the Virginia Education Sciences Training Program, supported by the US Department of Education Institute of Education Sciences.

As the incomes of affluent and poor families have diverged over the past three decades, so too has the educational performance of their children. But how exactly do the forces of rising inequality affect the educational attainment and life chances of low-income children?
Duncan will summarize results from the recently published book Whither Opportunity?(New York: Russell Sage, 2011), which he co-edited with Richard Murnane. In the book a team of economists, sociologists, and experts in social and education policy examines the corrosive effects of unequal family resources, disadvantaged neighborhoods, insecure labor markets, and worsening school conditions on K-12 education. This book illuminates the ways rising inequality is undermining one of the most important goals of public education—the ability of schools to provide children with an equal chance at academic and economic success.
 
 
Greg Duncan (Ph.D., Economics, University of Michigan, 1974) is Distinguished Professor, Department of Education at the University of California, Irvine.  For three decades, Duncan has published on issues of income distribution, poverty and welfare dependence and child development.  Duncan’s recent work has focused on estimating the role of school-entry skills and behaviors on later school achievement and attainment, the long-run impacts of poverty early in childhood on adult productivity and health, the long-run impacts on children and families in the Moving to Opportunity residential mobility experiment and the effects of increasing income inequality on schools and children’s life chances. Duncan was President of the Population Association of America in 2008, and President of the Society for Research in Child Development between 2009 and 2011. He was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2001 and National Academy of Education in 2009.

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